Swap Requested NOS Enicar Sherpa Guide Red City Pointer Ring for Enicar Sherpa Dive 33 Inner Red Bezel

Indy

New member
Hello Everyone,

I have been directed to this site by the Moderator Steve, from whom I have just purchased a NOS Enicar Sherpa Guide Red City Pointer Ring, which is absolutely as described. The only issue with this purchase comes down to my not reading correctly or comparing photographs.

Is anyone willing and able to exchange the above Red City Guide for the one i need for my Fathers 1964 Enicar Sherpa Dive 33 Inner Red Bezel. He used this watch when he worked as a Clearance Diver in Germany during the 1960's and I used to play with it as a 1-2 year old child (Completely fascinated). My father is now in his eighties and suffering from Dementia and I am trying to restore his watch to original condition (Hopefully to generate memories he can relate to). I am willing to accept a slightly worn Bezel, so long as it is serviceable, but would obviously prefer like for like.

As per Steve's advice I have included a few photographs of both my Fathers Watch minus Strap and the Red City Pointer Ring.

Hope you all remain fit well and secure, kindest regards

David
 

Attachments

SteveHarris

Administrator
Staff member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
Hi David,

Thanks for posting. I think most of us on here love hearing about histories attached to watches.

Just looking at the watch now but are you 100% sure it originally had a red pointer? @JimJupiter will probably chime in later but some of these didn't original have a red pointer.

Hopefully one of our lovely members can help you out but if not I'm happy to take it back as promised (y)

Thanks,

Steve
 

JimJupiter

Moderator
Staff member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
Yes, at the later dives there is no mistaking it needs to have a red ring. Sorry. Good news: the one from the Aqua Graph also fits ( slightly narrower triangle pointer), bad news, it’s almost as hard to find.

would love to hear more about your father and his watch.

nico
 

Indy

New member
Hi David,

Thanks for posting. I think most of us on here love hearing about histories attached to watches.

Just looking at the watch now but are you 100% sure it originally had a red pointer? @JimJupiter will probably chime in later but some of these didn't original have a red pointer.

Hopefully one of our lovely members can help you out but if not I'm happy to take it back as promised (y)

Thanks,

Steve
Hello Steve and everyone,
This is a very easy one for me, yes this particular watch was originally fitted with the inner Red Bezel and I remember it all through my early adult life as well. As a young boy my father told me how he used to use the two dials differently, one for his five/tank time and the other to assist with decompression stops. I was always curious as why, when and where it became detached from the main body. However by the time my Father gave me the watch, he had either forgotten or did not wish to say!

If I had a better close up lens, I would be able to show you the very clear and visible groove between the Crystal and the outer ring.

Oddly he passed the watch to me in a broken state and with horror stories of only one place in London to get it serviced and repaired. He said that as I was always fascinated by it, would I like it instead of throwing it away.Due to my not earning a great deal in my youth I just put it away with the fond memories.

Indeed I have only just had the watch returned after repairs and servicing and on receipt she was working beautifully, I thought it was a good idea to place the watch into an inch of cold water, I noted the single air bubble rise from between the crystal and the outer bezel and pondered on that, right up to the point of noticing condensation on the inside of the crystal and then the watch stopped.

So it’s due to gone it’s travels again, though I suspect that without the inner Red bezel, the water tight nature of the watch is compromised.

Just looking to try and raise a smile or flicker of recognition on my Fathers face when it is complete and I can slip it into his room.

Oddly to my way of thinking he changed from the Grain of Rice watch strap to a Stainless steel fixed curved type with round holes (I think 5 in total on each side reducing in size from the watch to the clasp and as I thought at the time a very clever miniature clone of his signature engraved on one side, this would have been around 1969/1970 ish. He explained the reason to me for the change as simply because of the size of his wrists he could never quite get the correct tension on the original strap and chasing the watch round his wrist underwater, kind of annoyed him.

kind regards

David
 

jbcollier

Member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
The red ring won't improve the seal. It's external and doesn't apply pressure. Given the lack of new service parts, particularly crowns, a waterproof seal is no longer possible. Get it sorted and enjoy it for what it is: a loving sentiment of your father.

If you would like to go diving, get a new watch as it will have a plentiful supply of service parts.
 

Indy

New member
The red ring won't improve the seal. It's external and doesn't apply pressure. Given the lack of new service parts, particularly crowns, a waterproof seal is no longer possible. Get it sorted and enjoy it for what it is: a loving sentiment of your father.

If you would like to go diving, get a new watch as it will have a plentiful supply of service parts.

Hello Jb,

Thank you for the information and this would make sense to me, however as always in life without detailed knowledge of the subject matter, you are often left with questions. I suppose if I am being honest, I just expected the Water seal system used by Enicar to be of such a superior design (Having read as much about it as I could find). However reading about something and experiencing the same is usually an educational process in its self, in my own experience.

I concur with your reasoning and as I placed the watch in the water it certainly crossed my mind and as I often tell my children, if your thinking about it, act on your instincts (Which I failed to observe). When you also then add in to the mix that the intended purpose of the Enicar is to try and jog (hopefully Good memories) for my Father, its ability or lack thereof to maintain a water seal is somewhat redundant, given his now advanced years and current state of health (My Father Barry was born in 1936).

I think what was going through my head was, if the plan comes to fruition and he does indeed experience the flashbacks that place him back in that period, that he does not get frustrated should he decide to test it, given that memories are exactly that and they go where they go. This could even be a memory about it having stopped working, you just never know. Your advice is very sound and obviously based in experience.

Kindest regards

David
 

jbcollier

Member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
On one of my Enicar chronographs, albeit not a waterproof one, my watchmaker took the time to say I shouldn't even wear it in the rain!

It's the crowns that are the main issue. Any you can find are all NOS so their rubber o-rings are 40+ years old.
 

Indy

New member
Hello JB,

Thank you for your reply and the information, which has generated a hopefully positive thoughtful response. Taking what you stated about NOS Rubbers.

I am a retired Fire-Fighter of some 32 years and in this role I have had many varied opportunities to contribute to our wider society in ways that are not appropriate to share on this forum, or even others. However as Draeger Breathing Apparatus Trained Service Engineer, we obviously used rubber seal's and I remember that to ensure the serviceability of the rubber seals we used. All engineers used paraffin wax as a means to ensure that the oxidation of the rubber when exposed to the corrosive effects of the atmosphere (Notably Oxygen), was negated.

You are very correct in stating that NOS rubber is 40 years old, however a Rubber gasket is exactly that....Rubber. My point being, any gasket will be of a certain diameter and thickness and composition, replicating this should only be a matter of application and not down to any expensive specific machining or pressing process. Put simply (For my understanding and not yours), a cast die with a specified cutting interior and exterior dimension would alleviate the issue of deteriorated seals due to aging processes.

If there is enough interest/market, it will be a simple matter of specifying a die manufactured to the required specifications to generate modern rubber seals to the meet the needs of the market, would you not agree. A Die stamp for each required diameter of seal would cost around £100 to manufacture and when you consider each die stamp would last ???????? Goodness knows how many years, would not every one be happy?

Your thoughts would be most welcome.

Kindest regards

David
 
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