What other vintage brands do you collect?

SteveHarris

Administrator
Staff member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
I must admit that I don't really collect any other brands per se but will pick up something that catches my eye. A 60's or 70's chrono normally does that :cool:.

Are there any vintage brands you would consider to be 'under the radar' that you like to collect?

Steve
 

JimJupiter

Moderator
Staff member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
Why do they have to be under the radar? ;)
I mainly collect 60s chronographs with something in the design I like. The classic for me is the Speedmaster from Omega. I have a 105.003 - 63 and a 145.022 -69, so straight and lyre lugs. Love em both and they suits you in every situation. Also Heuer did some great watches, but I came a bit to late in this came to affort the ones I wanted :D Despite I have a 3647N and D, a 1163MH and soon a 1550SG. The rest of my watches are wild mixes: Dugena, Certina, some Omegas. Tissot and some Type 20/21 Chronographs.

some of em in pics ;)

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Nico
 

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SteveHarris

Administrator
Staff member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
Quite a few crackers there Nico and a few I've never seen before. I'll have to do some research (y)

I've just picked up 2 vintage chronos today... 420

421

422

Valjoux 7733 in one and 7734 in the other. Lovely watches, I'm quite pleased.
 

Joe_A

New member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
Before the photos, a couple of thoughts . . .

I am new to this hobby relatively speaking - 2 to 3 years - and has been mentioned elsewhere, when one's interest is first awakened, one is likely to buy watches that will eventually be sold on or perhaps given away as one learns and develops a more personally refined taste. We can each and all wake up one day and realize that it is quite possible to have too many watches. Sometimes the "shine" just wears off. ;)

I became enamored for awhile with JLC and I decided I'd like something beautiful, but not one of the very high-end pieces, in the end I bought a dress watch in rose gold:

442

It's just been picked up after full service at RGM Watch Co. where I also had my S.G. Mk Id serviced.

Not long after I bought it, I realized that I don't need a dress watch as I do not go places all that often where one may be appreciated. :)

So what? I wear it now and then and it is small enough to where I may leave it to one of my granddaughters if either show an interest in it while I am still around.

Each of us here appear to have an abiding interest in tool watches . . . and I have developed an affinity for Enicar and Gallet.

I'll put the two Sherpa Graphs up side by side, inside and out in the appropriate thread, but let's speak about Gallet.

From somewhere not important . . .

Gallet is the world's oldest watch and clock making house with history dating back to Humbertus Gallet, a clock maker who became a citizen of Genève in 1466. ... Gallet is best known during the 20th century to the present day for its line of MultiChron chronograph wristwatches.
I had a nice telephone chat with David Laurence (Gallet) recently and he shared with me some of his understandings of the long and storied relationship among the families Gallet, Racine (Enicar) and the origins of Excelsior Park. The more one looks, the more one finds that the histories and the people involved in what we now refer to as vintage watches are intertwined - in some cases by intermarriage among the families.

So I have two MC12H watches:

446

What is "right" with this watch is nearly everything. I say "nearly" because the lugs, while beveled, have had the fine chamfer removed by polishing. Gallet has three watchmakers working at the moment, Larry, Lou and Happy and the watch is down in Peachtree Corners being serviced. I've asked for Happy, the fellow who restores cases, to see whether he can replace the missing very fine parallel chamfers.

Gallet produced the MC12 three register watches in two basic versions - movement-wise with either the Excelsior Park Park EP40 movement or the Valjoux 72 as is the case for our Graphs. There are many dial variations. The EP40 eventually had its balance wheel lightened and a mobile stud carrier fitted over the space of some years and the final version of the movement is the EP40-68 as seen here:

447

This movement can be adjusted to chronometer accuracy of the 1960s.

Here is the other one, also with the EP40-68:

445

This "Jim Clark" MC12H is at RGM Watch Co. where it will receive full service and have its pushers replaced and the hands relumed.

There are many interesting Gallet watches from which to choose and they are currently priced at about one-third to half what one would pay for a Sherpa Graph, give or take.

The next one of these I buy will likely be a "snow white."

There are Heuers I like, but my objections are like that of Nico. They cost too darn much for what you receive. One can buy a Croton or a Zodiac or even a Gallet Pilot - for a fraction of the price of an Autavia if one wants a loosely similar watch at a much more reasonable price.

More another time.
 
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kazrich

New member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
Hi Joe ;
That's a lovely collection and very similar to my own taste's.
From what I have seen from Nico's, Steve and your own collections we all have
very similar tastes - ie. Primarily, interesting 1960's quality sports watches.
I thought that Gallet produced different cases for the MC12 with different chamfers ?
Why not use your JLC alarm as a talking point ? Mine stops guests in their tracks when it's
activated at dinner parties. It's set to buzz when I need to leave to miss the traffic going home.
Sounds something between a manic cockroach and a cornered rattlesnake !
I tend not to activate it on crowded trains.
 

Joe_A

New member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
Gallet seems to have two basic lug types for the MC12 and both are beveled. The difference is in the chamfer which is either a subtle parallel edge chamfer or else a more dramatic triangular chamfer. I've observed that, when the movement is EP, the chamfer is more often subtle, whereas when the movement is Valjoux, it tends to be more bold.

Here's the type of chamfer I would accentuate on my two EP40-68 watches:

448

The next two happen to have the Valjoux 72 movements and also happen to have the triangular chamfers:

449

For those who may not know, one can tell which movement a Gallet Tachymeter/Telemeter watch has at a glance. In the case for an EP40, the 9 & 3 subdials are well inside the Telemeter scale. In the case of the Valjoux 72 watches, the subdial impinges upon the scale. Also . . .

The center axial circle for the 12-hour counter hand is slightly larger in diameter on an EP40 watch whereas the center circles on all three subdial hands are the same diameter for the Val. 72 watches.

Disclaimer: Nothing I post should be taken as authoritative. It only takes a photo or two to humble me. ;)
 

Joe_A

New member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
I decided to delete a post that went too far afield, but I did not see the delete button. ;)
 

kazrich

New member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
Yep. But the lug chamfers are almost too subtle to see with the naked eye.
Easy way to tell the difference on the wrist is
EP chrono pushers are equidistant from the crown.
Val 72 top pusher is closer to the crown than the bottom pusher . Same as Enicar Sherpa Graph ( also Val 72 )
When upturned only EP shows H on the left lug. The Valjoux doesn't.
 

Joe_A

New member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
I think the way the light is hitting the inverted Gallet by Racine photo above is about the sharpest and clearest I've ever seen the subtle parallel edge chamfer.

Note the "H" in my earlier post, as you say, seen only on the EP watches. According to David Laurence, Gallet made cases for a number of watchmakers who chose the EP movement. One can find the movement in watches by Excelsior Park, Sinn, Girard Perregaux and Zenith among others, no doubt. Gallet's own cases sometimes had the more pronounced chamfer.

Here is a Girard Perregaux with EP40 movement that I would like to acquire despite my having too many watches:

452

Good thing for my bank account that none are available!

I believe the one above belongs to WatchFred. Note the more pronounced triangular chamfers even though an EP based watch.

I forgot to mention the pusher spacing asymmetry on the Valjoux 23/72 family movements. Hard to sometimes see though unless looking squarely at the face or back. Looking at the photos of the "Jim Clark" MC12 with V.72 I put up, the asymmetry in the one on the left is harder to see whereas it's obvious in the one to the right - to a watch nerd, that is.
 

kazrich

New member
Enicaristi
Sherpa
Yes, the GP is a good looker.
If I were blindfold I could still easily tell between my EP 40-68 and a Val 72 ( as in Graph ).
When reset the Val 72 is smoother, and quieter.
The Excelsior Park snaps back to 12 with rifle bolt old school mechanical precision that can be felt in the hand.
Both movements are equally impressive in their own way but visually the EP movement is a beauty to behold.
 
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